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Table of Contents
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 285

Takayasu arteritis - Not to miss eye involvement


Department of Ophthalmology, Shri Lal Bahadur Shastri Government Medical College and Hospital, District Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India

Date of Submission11-Jul-2022
Date of Decision16-Jul-2022
Date of Acceptance17-Jul-2022
Date of Web Publication25-Oct-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anubhav Chauhan
Department of Ophthalmology, Shri Lal Bahadur Shastri Government Medical College and Hospital, Ner Chowk, District Mandi, Himachal Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ajim.ajim_96_22

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How to cite this article:
Chauhan A, Sharma DK. Takayasu arteritis - Not to miss eye involvement. APIK J Int Med 2022;10:285

How to cite this URL:
Chauhan A, Sharma DK. Takayasu arteritis - Not to miss eye involvement. APIK J Int Med [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Dec 4];10:285. Available from: https://www.ajim.in/text.asp?2022/10/4/285/359448



We read with great interest the excellent article by Umakanth and Biradar titled “Takayasu arteritis in young female a case report.”[1] We applaud the efforts of the authors in describing the challenges in detail. However, we would like to highlight an important aspect which is missing in the case report. The ocular examination should always be carried out in these patients.

Ocular involvement in the form of Takayasu retinopathy is often seen. It has been classified into four stages by Uyama and Asayma.[2]

  • Stage 1 – Distension of veins
  • Stage 2 – Microaneurysm formation
  • Stage 3 – Arteriovenous anastomoses formation
  • Stage 4 – Ocular complications such as cataract, rubeosis iridis, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, central retinal artery occlusion, and ocular ischemic syndrome.


Takayasu retinopathy is seen in up to 37% of patients.[3] Other ocular manifestations include uveitis, sclerokeratitis, amaurosis fugax, macular edema, exudative retinal detachment, optic neuropathy, and anterior and posterior circulation stroke.[4] Treatment for Takayasu arteritis with drugs like steroids may itself result in diminution of vision due to complications such as cataracts, glaucoma, and central serous retinopathy.[5] A thorough ophthalmic evaluation is necessary so as not to miss ocular involvement in patients with Takayasu arteritis.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Umakanth AV, Biradar S. Takayasu arteritis in young female a case report. APIK J Int Med 2022;10:124-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Peter J, David S, Joseph G, Horo S, Danda D. Hypoperfusive and hypertensive ocular manifestations in Takayasu arteritis. Clin Ophthalmol 2010;4:1173-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Johnston SL, Lock RJ, Gompels MM. Takayasu arteritis: A review. J Clin Pathol 2002;55:481-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Peter J, Joseph G, Mathew V, Peter JV. Visual loss in Takayasu arteritis – Look beyond the eye. J Clin Diagn Res 2014;8:MD06-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Peter J, David S, Danda D, Peter JV, Horo S, Joseph G. Ocular manifestations of Takayasu arteritis: A cross-sectional study. Retina 2011;31:1170-8.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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